Jen commented requesting a tutorial on how I take my snowflake pictures, so I’m here to attempt one! It started snowing this afternoon, it was fluffy, then turned into sleet :/ but I did get a few pictures.

First off, I shoot in Manual mode, with my macro lens set to manual mode so I can control the focus. Most times, you will want to use a tripod, I’m not one for extra equipment and bulk, so I rarely use my tripod. I like to find things in nature to stabilize my camera. Of course, if it’s in a really low light situation, I get the tripod out!

Macro Snowflake Tutorial by Seven Sisters Blog

Then, using a dark sock hat, I either catch the snowflakes, or dip it in the snow:)

Macro Snowflake Tutorial by Seven Sisters Blog

 

After studying which flake I should shoot, get my settings how I like them, then shoot 🙂

Macro Snowflake Tutorial by Seven Sisters Blog

 

Let me give you a run through on settings 🙂

 White balance:

This controls the temperature of the picture, weather you want to catch the warmth of that ‘yellowish’ sunny day, or the cold ‘blue’ of a winter day.

Iso: 

The speed or light-sensitivity of a digital camera’s sensor is rated in ISOnumbers — the lower the number, the slower the response to light. Higher ISO numbers indicate a higher sensitivity to light, so less time is needed to expose a picture.

But if you get too high of a ISO, you introduce ‘camera noise’ into the picture. (noise, meaning grainy)

Shutter speed:

Controls the amount of time the shutter is open taking the light in.

Aperture, or F stop:

Controls how much light the camera lets into the sensor

Haha, okay, you probably didn’t think you were going to get a photography lesson 😉 But if your beginning on your DLSR, I would recommend using P (Program) mode, it sets the shutter speed for you, allowing you to adjust a few settings on your own.

So with that said, I’ll show you a couple pictures and their settings.

 White Balance- today was a cloudy day so I chose: Shutter speed-1/200, F stop-5.0, ISO- 1600

Macro Snowflake Tutorial by Seven Sisters Blog

 

This one is the same except for the F stop, it was 6.3, but in this picture, you can see I had a rather high ISO, which is why the background is rather grainy and not smooth like the next picture.

Macro Snowflake Tutorial by Seven Sisters Blog

 

This one has a smooth background because the ISO is lower.

Macro Snowflake Tutorial by Seven Sisters Blog

 

And, if that didn’t make any sense whatsoever, feel free to comment and ask any question you want, and I’ll see what I can do to answer you 🙂 !!!

But most of all, don’t stress. Have fun! And really, no photographer, (professional or amateur, ) always gets it perfectly right!

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Macro Snowflake Tutorial
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7 thoughts on “Macro Snowflake Tutorial

  • January 11, 2015 at 7:20 pm
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    Anna, I was outside yesterday quite a bit trying to take the perfect snowflake pic. I understand what you are saying in you post. I sure wish you would’ve posted it one day earlier. LoL. And as soon as my husband returns my camera cord (he accidentally took it to work), I will see how I did. Next time tho I will for sure use the suggestions from your post. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2015 at 7:47 pm
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    Thank you SO much for this! I truly do appreciate it. I cannot wait to get outside and play around with this.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2015 at 10:36 pm
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    Hey, Just wondering what Camera you have? I’m a fellow photographer (I have the Canon Rebel XS) and am interested to see what you are using! Thank you. 🙂

    Reply
    • January 12, 2015 at 11:37 am
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      I use a Sony A37 🙂 It’s a really cool camera, but I’ve had thoughts of switching to canon!

      Reply
  • January 11, 2015 at 11:00 pm
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    WOW! Thanks for the advice on the settings for the camera, I still have problems figuring out all the complex settings!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2015 at 7:39 pm
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    BEAUTIFUL pictures! Love the closeups of the snowflakes! When I saw your other post with snowflake pics, I honestly thought they weren’t real picture–that they were computer generated images! I didn’t think it was possible to photograph something like that. That’s how good they are! 🙂

    Reply
    • January 14, 2015 at 2:15 pm
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      Aw, thank you Sarah! That means a lot 🙂

      Reply

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